Product description

Fairifield is they type of garment you can throw on over just about anything to ward off the cooler temperatures of early Fall. The round neckline and A-line silhouette give the sweater a casual feel. The reverse stockinette fabric and 1×1 ribbed trims create a subtle backdrop for beautiful cable & lace detailing. Instructions are provided for working tubular cast ons and bind offs – details that give your garment that extra special finish.

Designer: Michele Wang

Collection: Fall 2012

 

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Fairfield

Cable & Lace Cardigan

Languages Available
  • English
Skill Level 4 of 5
$9.00 (PDF)
  • Product description

    Fairifield is they type of garment you can throw on over just about anything to ward off the cooler temperatures of early Fall. The round neckline and A-line silhouette give the sweater a casual feel. The reverse stockinette fabric and 1×1 ribbed trims create a subtle backdrop for beautiful cable & lace detailing. Instructions are provided for working tubular cast ons and bind offs – details that give your garment that extra special finish.

    Designer: Michele Wang

    Collection: Fall 2012

     

  • Pattern materials

    YARDAGE

    • Approximately 1015 (1120, 1235, 1370, 1500, 1635) yards of worsted weight wool yarn


    YARN

    • 8 (8, 9, 10, 11, 12) skeins of Brooklyn Tweed Shelter (100% American Targhee-Columbia wool; 140 yards/50g)
    • Photographed in color Sweatshirt


  • Pattern specs

    GAUGE

    • Working and Finished Gauge: 20 stitches & 29 rows = 4″ in Reverse Stockinette Stitch with Gauge Needle; before and after blocking


    NEEDLES Size A (Gauge Needle):

    • One pair of straight or circular needles in size needed to obtain gauge listed

    • Suggested Size: 4½ mm (US 7)


    Size B (Ribbing Needle):

    • One pair of straight or circular needles and one additional 24” circular needle two sizes smaller than Gauge Needle

    • Suggested Size: 3¾ mm (US 5)


    Size C (for Tubular Cast On only):

    • One pair of straight or circular needles three sizes smaller than the Gauge Needle
    • 
Suggested Size: 3¼ mm (US 3)


    FINISHED DIMENSIONS

    • 33 (37, 41, 45, 49, 53)” finished (blocked and buttoned) garment at bust
    • Intended Ease: +3-4”
    • Sample shown is size 37” with + 4“ of ease on model


  • Pattern Updates

    24 September 2012: (Version 2.0):

    The wording has been clarified in the sections for Shaping Neck and Shoulders on both Right and Left Fronts:

    Page 5, Column 1: Paragraphs 10 and 11 have been changed to read as follows: “Bind off 1 stitch at the beginning of the next 11 (11, 12, 11, 11, 12) RS rows. AT THE SAME TIME, when armhole measures 7 (7¼, 7¾, 8¼, 8¾, 9¼), ending with a RS row, shape Shoulder as follows…”

    Page 6, Column 1: Paragraphs 10 and 11 have been changed to read as follows: “Bind off 1 stitch at the beginning of the next 11 (11, 12, 11, 11, 12) WS rows. AT THE SAME TIME, when armhole measures 7 (7¼, 7¾, 8¼, 8¾, 9¼)”,  ending with a WS row, Shape Shoulder as follows…”


    3 October 2012: (Version 3.0):

    An error under the “Shape Armholes” sections of the pattern was discovered that only effects the smallest size:

    Page 3, 2nd Column (Back): The first paragraph under “Shape Armholes” should read as follows “Bind off 4 (5, 6, 7, 8, 9) stitches at the beginning of the next 2 rows, then 3 stitches at the beginning of the next 2 rows, then 0 (2, 2, 2, 2, 2) stitches at the beginning of the next 0 (2, 2, 2, 2, 2) rows – 76 (80, 88, 96, 104, 112) stitches remain.”

    Page 5, 1st Column (Right Front): The first paragraph under the “Shape Armholes” should read as follows: “Bind off 4 (5, 6, 7, 8, 9) stitches at the beginning of the next row (WS), then 3 stitches at the beginning of the next WS row, then 0 (2, 2, 2, 2, 2) stitches at the beginning of the following 0 (1, 1, 1, 1, 1) WS row – 36 (38, 42, 46, 50, 54) stitches remain.”

    Page 6, 1st Column (Left Front): The first paragraph under the “Shape Armholes” should read as follows: “Bind off 4 (5, 6, 7, 8, 9) stitches at the beginning of the next row (RS), then 3 stitches at the beginning of the next RS row, then 0 (2, 2, 2, 2, 2) stitches at the beginning of the following 0 (1, 1, 1, 1, 1) RS row – 36 (38, 42, 46, 50, 54) stitches remain.”

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