Redford draws its inspiration from well-loved vintage tee shirts – the kind that get better with each wash and wear. Though the sweater doesn’t announce them loudly, it features some subtle details that elevate it above the average everyday pullover.

Side panels are worked in reverse stockinette stitch and assembled with exposed seam lines to highlight their slightly angled shape. The change in fabric offers a subtle yet graphic detail along the sides of the garment (see a detail photo here).

The stockinette portion of the sleeves are worked from the bottom up, beginning just above the cuff line. After completion, cuff stitches are picked up from the wrong side – creating another exposed seam detail – and worked down in a 1×1 rib, finishing with a clean tubular bind off.

Finally, an inverted triangle is worked in reverse stockinette and nestled just below the ribbed collar at center front, adding a finishing touch to that “favorite tee” vibe.

Worked in Loft, the sweater’s fabric is lightweight and easy to layer (it looks great whether worn with a denim jacket or a sport coat) and is particularly useful for hot-blooded men who overheat in heavier sweaters. The garment is worked flat in pieces and seamed together for added structure and strength.

The hardest decision of all: which color to choose?

One of the best parts about putting this collection together was being allowed to indulge my selfish side in creating a garment that I’ve been daydreaming about for quite some time. I’ve had visions of Timberline dancing in my head for years (really), and it seemed like the right time to finally make this garment a reality.

My favorite type of sweaters are the ones you just want to live in, whether dressed up or dressed down. This is the kind of sweater that I like to crawl into and hibernate; I guess I consider it my own grown-up version of a security blanket.

The cables on this cardigan are sculptural – the fabric feels substantial and protective. In the beginning, the main “Timberline” cable motif began as something completely different – a smaller cable that went through 4 or 5 total iterations before arriving at its final state. I became quite fond of it in the end. It references traditional staghorn cables, but with a more organic flow. It also paired nicely with the traditional 9-stitch braid that flanks it on either side.

I wanted to knit this design in Shelter so the lightness of the yarn would keep the garment from being overly heavy. The result is just what I was after (you have to savor those moments when they happen!): it feels substantial, but there is no worry that the fabric will stretch vertically under its own weight.

Full disclosure: this pattern is not for the faint of heart. All told it spans 24 pages and spares no detail. But if you want a special knit that you can pour your soul into, this is the one! The garment features tubular cast ons, completely integrated ribbing-to-cable transitions, corded selvedges, a shawl collar with integrated rib shaping, and partially seamless construction (body and sleeves worked seamlessly from hem to underarm; upper body and sleeve caps worked flat). The ribbed button bands are worked on a much smaller needle to create a strong, structured fabric, then seamed onto their respective garment fronts for a beautiful, polished finish.

I hope you enjoy this one! In the meantime, I’ll be counting down the days until the weather once again allows for the wearing of such woolly clothing.

 

Julie’s seamless Chesterfield pullover strikes that great balance between being easy to knit and fashionable to wear. The body and sleeves are worked circularly from the hem/cuff to the underarm. At that point, all pieces are joined together and worked circularly to shape the raglan yoke (also worked circularly, with no seams). The squishable ribbed turtleneck is worked last – and for those guys who feel a little stifled with all that wool up around their necks, substituting a simple stockinette rolled edge, or a shallow 1×1 ribbed neckband is a snap.

If you look closely at the fabric, you’ll notice that the colors have a marled appearance – this is achieved by working with two different colors of Loft (our fingering weight wool yarn) held together and treated as a single strand. The resulting fabric is the same as a worsted weight yarn, but with a beautiful, mottled look.

Between the combination of the colorblocking at the base of the garment and the marled yarn, five separate colors are used in total to create the look shown above. Again, if the colorblocking isn’t your (or your guy’s) cup of tea, the entire garment can easily be knit in a single color for a more traditional look.

The basic shape and construction of this garment allows for all kinds of individual modifications to suit your own tastes – I love seeing how knitters experiment and modify our designs. Isn’t that one of the best reasons for making your own clothes, after all? As an added bonus, Julie included a “girlfriend” version of the sweater that incorporates waist shaping to decrease bulk in the body, while maintaining an overall cozy, oversized feel. See photos of the modeled girlfriend version on Chesterfield’s pattern page.

The Hugo pullover is a modern take on the traditional fisherman’s gansey – with its low-relief allover cable motifs paired with handsome moss stitch. The traditional layout of cables contrasts more modern elements like the slashed ribbed turtleneck and updated silhouette.

Hugo‘s proportions sit closer to the body than a traditional pullover for a slimming effect; the long sleeves cover the full wrist while the body falls just below the belt line. This stylish silhouette creates an eye-catching update to the historic ganseys we all know and love.

Véronik chose to work up her design in Shelter‘s “Stormcloud” colorway – a rich, warm grey that features undertones of both brown and blue. A surprisingly versatile color, it pairs with both warm tones (as photographed), or cooler blue and grey shades (any shade of denim).

The slashed ribbed turtleneck has a garter stitch placket with snap closures, though it can be easily modified to feature traditional buttons/buttonholes, or knit circularly as a more traditional stand-up collar.

Every so often a photoshoot location comes along that just blows me away – either for its history, its beauty, or in the best-case scenario its combination of both. We were lucky enough to find a truly stunning one for our BT Men shoot, and I wanted to take the opportunity to share a little bit of history about this place with you here.

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The space shown in these photos  is situated on the top floor of one of what was originally 16 industrial buildings dotting the waterfront along the East River in the Greenpoint neighborhood of Brooklyn. Originally called the “Greenpoint Terminal Market”, this complex of 19th century buildings was once an industrial juggernaut, housing multiple maritime warehouse operations, including the American Manufacturing Company – then the largest manufacturer of maritime rope in the entire country.

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At its peak, the Market employeed over 2,500 workers and spanned 6 city blocks. Walking through some of the now-abandoned spaces really got my mind wandering. I love imagining the sights, sounds, and lives that occupied this space during that period.

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In 2006, the complex was engulfed in one of the worst fires in NYC’s recent history – the “five alarm” blaze required 350 firefighters and 70 individual units to extinguish. Much of the complex that stretches along sleepy West Street was destroyed in the fire and soon after demolished. Those few buildings that did survive, however, have been given new life through the help of artists and entrepeneuers who have repurposed many of the spaces as studios or business start-up locations.

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Shooting in this space was a true pleasure and gave my nerdy, NYC-historian side some serious research material to geek out over.

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If you’d like to read more about the history of the Greenpoint Terminal Market (or some of its more recent real estate scandals) – check out this wonderful article from Atlas Obscura.

 

Today feels like a very “full-circle” experience for me as we release our very first collection of knitting patterns exclusively for men.

It doesn’t feel like so long ago that I was a new knitter, searching for male sweater patterns that suited my own tastes, needs, and abilities. Though the absence of such patterns was perhaps the single most influential factor in my path towards knitwear design, I’ve always remembered the frustration I felt as a result of my limited options.

Knitting has taken me on quite an unexpected and wonderful journey since then, and all along the way I’ve daydreamed about creating patterns for men that might help those knitters who find themselves in the same place that I was then – be you a male knitter yourself, or any knitter with a husband, brother, son, partner or friend who has at one time or another made that sacred request for a handknit sweater or accessory.

Last year, when I pitched the idea of a men’s collection to the design team, an immediate excitement engulfed. That fervor stayed strong all throughout the process – we’ve had a great time putting all the puzzle pieces of this collection together. In designing, we set out to create knits that were understated and easy to wear, but maintained details that made them special (and enjoyable to make by hand).

Selfishly, I loved having the excuse to design and create some of the pieces that I’ve been been wishing were in my own closet for quite some time!

The look book features the entire collection – 8 garments and 5 accessories – that cover a range of skill (and commitment) levels, from beginner to advanced.

 

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We hope you enjoy our first small contribution to the genre of men’s knits!

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Resources: The BT Men look book can be viewed on our website here, or download the free PDF for viewing on your tablet or device.

Each pattern is available for instant download here, or on Ravelry.com. Brooklyn Tweed yarns used in the collection are available for purchase online, or at one of our 16 flagship retail locations.

Our Design Team just wrapped up a couple of wonderfully creative days in the design studio, planning for future collections. This is what our collections look like at their earliest stage of development.

This is one of my favorite stages in the process – ideas are fluid, mix easily and often combine to create even better ones. The piles and piles of swatches aren’t bad either…

I’m very excited to announce a new job opportunity at Brooklyn Tweed for which we are now accepting applications.

We always look forward to adding new members to the BT family and are excited about this new position!

Comprehensive information about the position is available below – including the downloadable application form. We look forward to getting to know the applicants!

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Now Hiring: Studio & Administrative Assistant; Part-time

We are looking for a qualified Studio & Administrative Assistant in the NYC/NJ metro area. The Assistant’s primary duties
include daily customer relations tasks (e-mail & phone relations), social media maintenance, and comprehensive secretarial/administrative support in our office. This person will work closely with the company owner and operations manager to assist on a wide range of day-to-day tasks in both administrative and creative areas.

The position is currently part-time (approx. 20 hours per week; 9AM to 1PM weekdays) in our Jersey City, NJ office/studio – a short subway ride from downtown Manhattan and easily accessible from all boroughs as well as the NJ metro area. We are a growing business and it is likely that this will progress into a full-time position over the next 12 months. This is an ideal position for people just out of school who are looking for an entry-level position in the fashion, design, and/or handknitting industries.

If you are a self-motivated person interested in knitting, yarn manufacturing and design, and like working in a focused, creative and collaborative atmosphere, this job will be a good fit for you. 

Application Due Date: July 9, 2013

Click below to download the full job description and the application form now.

 

Download the application here

Please submit all necessary materials via e-mail to jobs@brooklyntweed.net by the listed deadline in order to be considered for the position. Thank you!

 

Bolt comes to us from Finland, where designer Veera Välimäki loves playing with garter stitch, stripes and short rows. Having amassed quite the following for her creations, I was super excited to see what she would create for us!

I haven’t knit one myself (yet!), but can see this pattern being quite addictive. It has all the ingredients: an unusual item that is easy to wear and fun to style, use of two colors allowing for innumerable combinations, a fun rhythm while knitting, just enough shaping and variety to keep things interesting as you work while still qualifying as “mindless” knitting (perfect for almost any occasion), and a relatively quick timeline.

Choosing color is the hardest part for projects like this. Between Veera and I, it’s probably not a shocker that we chose a greyscale combination, but just think of all the different variations of color that are possible! I love the idea of Truffle Hunt + Hayloft,  Fossil + Sap,  Old World + Embers…. the possibilities are really endless.

The shawl is worked flat and includes no purling whatsoever (hooray!). The triangle on the right in the photo above is worked first, with a 6-ridge striping sequence. Upon completion, the short row section is picked up directly from Triangle 1 and worked in the opposing direction. The short rows create visible wedge shapes in the lighter color and add a slight curve to the overall shape. A short section of the 6-row striping sequence is worked again, then the piece is finished with a length of solid (darker) color.

I’m really looking forward to seeing what kind of Bolt variations are already being created by our readers – have fun!

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Resources: Bolt is available as a PDF download at Brooklyn Tweed or Ravelry. The pattern is knit with two colors of Loft yarn, shown here in colors Soot and Sweatshirt.

Frida was designed by Tokyo-based knitter Hiroko Fukatsu, one of three Japanese designers that contributed to this installment of Wool People.

I admit I have a special place in my heart for Japanese knitting – it’s a big source of inspiration in my own work and I’ve really enjoyed getting to know a few great folks from Japan in the past year who share a deep passion for knitting.

Roko submitted this shawl design as a finished sample she had already made and I was so charmed by the unexpected use of loop stitch – a “striped” application I had never seen before on this type of project – that I asked if she’d be willing to see how the shawl worked up in Loft. The result has a fun, funky quality that I think would be fun to style in a variety of ways.

Frida has a wider, shallower proportion than your average lace triangle, due to the non-traditional shaping sequence Roko deployed in the design. Bands of lace, stockinette and loop-stitch texture create stripes over the body of the shawl, which is worked from the top down. The scalloped lace edge is worked as a part of the main shawl – no additional edging is needed. Score another one for non-fussy construction!

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Resources: Frida is available as a PDF download at Brooklyn Tweed or Ravelry. The pattern is knit with Loft yarn, shown here in color Homemade Jam.