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Winter of Colorwork KAL Part 6: Steeking

Winter of Colorwork KAL Part 6: Steeking

Welcome back knitters! For those of you who have been knitting Pascal cardigans along with us, you should now be done knitting the body of your cardigan. If you are still working on your sweater, don't fret! We'll be here for you when you're ready. Before we secure and cut the steek, we’ll be grafting together our underarm stitches using a tapestry needle and the Kitchener Stitch. The Kitchener Stitch is used to sew live stitches together in a way that mimics a row of knitting. Pieces to be joined are live on needles, with right sides facing out and both...

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Applying Techniques: Lavender Sachets

A year of new yarns and patterns mean lots of swatches for us to play with here in the Brooklyn Tweed office. So we thought, what better way to repurpose our Peerie colorwork swatches than to refresh our Lavender Sachets tutorial and share the inspiration? We love how cheerful, festive, and sweet-smelling this new batch of colorwork sachets turned out. They’re also delightfully quick and satisfying to make — so much so that we couldn’t help but zip up Svenson Pullover cabled swatches too. (Last-minute stocking stuffers, anyone?) Eager to repurpose your own swatches? Revisit our tutorial below! In the...

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Tips for Keeping Track while Knitting with Charts

In the latest installment of our Foundations series, we walk you through the fundamentals of reading knitting charts — deciphering chart symbols, determining the direction of reading, working simultaneously from charts and written instructions, and more. Today, we're sharing our tips and tricks for keeping track while reading charts so you can have a more manageable, stress-free, and enjoyable experience while knitting. Keeping Track of Rows or Rounds Charts are read row by row or round by round, much like how you would work a knitted item. However, as you progress from the bottom to the top of the chart,...

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Lace Blocking: The Big Reveal

Blocking lace is one of the most transformative processes in knitting, one that surprises and delights us every time. After you've faithfully created a pool of open — and perhaps unruly — stitches in your favorite yarn, the moment you pull a crisply blocked sheet of wool off the board is satisfying for the soul. You may wish to call for an audience when you do the unpinning! Today we outline our preferred lace-blocking process in hopes of helping you make the most of your knitting time and cross the finish line with a stunning piece of lace. Here's what you'll need: 1.) Rust-proof T-pins (the rust-proof...

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Lace KAL Project Planning, Part 2

Once you’re feeling confident about your pattern choice, the fun begins: it’s time to gather your supplies and cast on a swatch! Yarn  Most regions of the world with strong lace-knitting traditions used a two-ply yarn for lace pieces because this balanced structure is the most receptive to opening up with blocking to reveal the openwork patterns. Brooklyn Tweed’s Shelter, Loft, Vale, and Plains are all constructed on this principle. The worsted preparation of Vale and Plains lends extra strength to the yarn so it can better withstand a stiff blocking, and the smooth alignment of the fibers gives crisp...

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