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New Shelter & Loft Colors

Introducing three newly blended heathers to nestle into the warm, cool, and neutral color families of Shelter and Loft! Explore these new colors in Loft with Gudrun Johnston’s hap-inspired Perch Shawl, designed especially for this release, or browse our extensive pattern archive for other gems knit with Shelter and Loft.

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Our Fall 2015 Collection

We’re tremendously excited to launch both a new design collection and a new yarn today! Quarry is a chunky brother to Shelter and Loft, made from the same Wyoming-grown Targhee-Columbia wool. Each plump 100-gram skein is 200 warm and lofty yards, and although it looks like a single ply, it’s actually three unspun strands nestled together and gently twisted. Our goal was to create a chunky-weight wool that marries the airy softness of a roving-style yarn with enough tensile strength and roundness to produce well-defined cables and textured knitwear. Quarry comes in ten fresh heathered hues. As we were developing...

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Putting It Together: Mill Tour Part 5 of 5

Our yarn has come a long way from its original state as scoured wool. The construction is now complete and only a few finishing touches remain. The yarn must now be removed from the bobbins in 50-gram (140 yard) increments to create individual skeins. The skeining machine (which unfortunately eluded my camera) is set for a certain number of rotations (pre-measured based on that specific yarn's yards-per-gram ratio) which wind off consistent, exact amounts for each skein. The 50-gram skeins are placed in a plastic lined box and sent along for a final wash. In order to remove residual spinning grease...

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Live Free or Ply: Mill Tour Part 4 of 5

Yesterday we ended with a fresh batch of singles loaded up onto bobbins.  Because Shelter is a 2-ply yarn, the next step obviously involves plying, but before that can happen these babies get a trip to the Wool Sauna. A proper steaming of the yarn in its current form is necessary before plying begins. Steaming saturates the fibers with moisture, causing them to relax and accept their new identity as twisted plies. Before steaming, the (newly given) tension in each ply is fighting to unravel.  Much in the same way a good blocking makes everyone's knitting look better *cough*, the...

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Singles Ready to Mingle: Mill Tour Part 3 of 5

We left off yesterday with a rack full of fine strands of roping. Because these ropings currently lack twist, they appear thicker than they will be in the finished yarn. Adding twist to fiber is the key to making yarn -- it traps necessary energy and tension into the yarn, increasing strength and (in most cases) elasticity. The amount of twist you add when making single plies of yarn is very important and can take the hand and behavior of the yarn in different directions. Any amount of twist though, be it a lot or a little, is essential for creating...

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