Archives for category: Mittens

To say I found myself victim to a serious cable-hunger this Fall would be an understatement. My design work is kinda littered with them – these gloves being no exception. My head has been filled with root-wrapped accessories and knot-riddled sweaters (what’s new, really?). When I think about it, I’m still kinda stunned by how amazing cables really are. I mean… who thought this up in the first place anyway? I don’t think I’ll ever get sick of playing with them.

[Oh, before I start talking shop about these and forget: this pattern can be found in Vogue Knitting Winter 2008/09, which I think hits the stands this week, if it hasn't already. Ravelry link here.]

Almeara Gloves

When I got to thinking about super cabley gloves, visions of some root-like gauntlets came to mind – like some fancy armor cast-off from a lost and forgotten forest fantasy world. Leave it to my adolescent fantasy-novel-reading past. Again – cables just do that to me.

Almeara Gloves

With the fear of cable seduction and going overboard, I opted for something simple on the palm: enter garter stitch, my longtime companion. This wonderful yarn (Rowan Scottish Tweed DK) was kinda begging for something textural on the palmside. A DK woolen-spun two ply – this stuff is light and oh-so-woolly, with a touch of irregularity that makes it so beautiful. I wouldn’t at all mind knitting up a whole sweater out of this one. This is me making a mental note.

Almeara Gloves

The motifs on the hands are mirrored – same cables, just raying out in opposing directions. The choice of individual unique cables along each finger (a decision I may have cursed myself for while charting the pattern…) make this one a bit more involved than say, mittens of the same flavor, but I hope it’s worth the extra work, cause they are kinda fun in the end.

Almeara Gloves

There’s an I-cord cast-on for these which, if you haven’t tried it, you’re in or a treat! Definitely on my top 10 list of fun knitting tricks.

The pattern is accompanied with a fancy-pants article which always seems so very twilight zone, but is very flattering nonetheless and I’m absoluely grateful for it!

Almeara Gloves

I hope you enjoy these! And I’m also hoping for the wintry, wool-wearing weather to stick around for a good while so the sweater (glove/mitten/hat/fill in your own blank) drawer can keep its regular rotation.

Are you getting sick of me constantly worshiping Winter yet?

Almeara Gloves

It’s always a wonderful moment when magazine previews hit the Internet because then we designers finally get to share some of our little secrets from the past year. I designed and knit these mittens up in the spring and really grew quite attached to them, so I’m really happy to finally introduce the two of you.

Druid Mittens (by b r o o k l y n t w e e d)

This pattern will be available in the upcoming Fall/Winter issue of Vogue Knitting, along with many other wonderful mitten designs from a handful of great designers. A little mitten spread seems like just the ticket for Fall knitting, doesn’t it?

Druid Mittens (by b r o o k l y n t w e e d)

The concept for these was something intricate and beautiful with lots of detail. The mittens are knit in fingering weight Shetland wool (Jamieson’s Spindrift, one of my all-time faves, in the ‘Leprechaun colorway’) and covered with texture. Not the quickest knit, but really fun for us detail-oriented-types. Or those of us who just plain love bobbles (I’m not ashamed).

Druid Mittens (by b r o o k l y n t w e e d)

The pattern features knit-purl patterning on the cuff, shaped wrist, gusseted thumb, and garter stitch straps flanking the sides (I had to squeeze the garter in there somehow). The palm is worked in a textured tweed stitch and the thumb features its own little cable motif that grows out of the gusset.

Druid Mittens (by b r o o k l y n t w e e d)

The mitten is closed with a garter stitch saddle – a little detail that I really love. The garter stitch panels on either side come up and over the fingers, capping the top seamlessly, a la seamless saddle shoulder sweater construction, and are grafted together to finish up.

Druid Mittens (by b r o o k l y n t w e e d)

Being such a busy little pair of mittens, they require some acrobatic needle work and because of it look pretty lumpy after knitting. I highly recommend a warm wash in the sink – which will do wonders for this pattern and Shetland in general. They seemed a little limp and less-than-impressive before their bath, but afterwards bloomed wonderfully – the fabric becomes much more cohesive and the cables pop. If you aren’t an immersion-blocker, making an exception for these babies will really pay off.

Druid Mittens (by b r o o k l y n t w e e d)

I’ve listed the pattern over on Ravelry if you want to check up on all the specifics, see the other patterns featured in this issue, or queue the project for your Fall or Winter knitting.

Druid Mittens (by b r o o k l y n t w e e d)

And the honor of all honors: the folks at Vogue chose these for the cover of the issue! Talk about flattering!

Vogue Fall 2008 Cover (by b r o o k l y n t w e e d)

photo courtesy of Soho Publishing


Enjoy the issue!

Last week while riding the train early in the morning with my bare hands stuffed deep in the pockets of my winter jacket I decided I was sick of having cold hands in the morning. Last weekend I resolved to put my current knitting on hold and tend to my cold-hand problem post-haste.

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See, I’m a fidgety person who tends to keep busy at all times (a blessing and a curse), including in transit – so mittens aren’t great for me. I love knitting them but feel positively annoyed while wearing them in most situations. Too many times I’ve tried to answer the phone or scribble some notes in a notebook while mitten-clad, only to see my phone crash onto the sidewalk or my pen go flying under my neighbors subway seat. And lets not even talk about coffee spillage. Granted gloves also lend themselves to an obvious loss of dexterity but at this point in the winter, it’s all relative.

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Pattern: Ken (free from the Berroco design team) [*via Ravelry]

Materials: Noro Kureyon; #51

Amount: 160 grams (just over 1.5 skeins)

Needles: US8/5.0mm Double Pointed Needles

Started: 22 February 2008

Finished: 23 February 2008

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This was a total impulse knit. I didn’t even have a pattern in mind, just grabbed two balls of Kureyon from the stash and went pattern-huntin‘ on Ravelry. I found this free pattern, got gauge on the first try and went for it. There’s something really refreshing about spicing up your knitting with small, impulse-projects, especially when they work out – and I find that they often do. Maybe it’s the absence of obsessive planning and worrying that seems to surprise us time and again.

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I like this pattern – it’s fitted and detailed while remaining straightforward. Knitting ten fingers is always kind of a drag, but at this gauge they go mighty quick. I think that Kureyon is slightly heavier than the yarn called for in the pattern and makes for a semi-dense, very fitted glove. I really like it like this, but if you prefer a glove with a bit of ease on your hands, I’d recommend maybe using a different yarn or jumping up a needle size.

Green Fingers (by b r o o k l y n t w e e d)

I guess I should also mention that my hands are large-ish and the pattern specifies a men’s medium, so if you have average size manhands, you can probably disregard my previous warning.

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I was putting off knitting myself a pair of gloves, mostly because I continue to entertain the idea that spring is just around the corner. I know that this is wishful thinking here in the city, and winter is, after all, one of my favorite times of year. Although I think most of us knitters are perpetually wistful for Fall, winter is pretty great too (Sometimes I forget. Usually early in the morning).

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To sum up – this is a great *free* pattern that is definitely worthy of being squeezed into a weekend. Why not go spelunking in your stash and surprise someone you love with warm hands for the rest of the winter? Until next time – happy knitting.