I’m home after a wonderful week of adventures — simple knitting projects, simple foods, and many a click on the old odometer (people drive fast in Italy) — oh what fun! I took the opportunity of being in the middle of such a visually rich country (texture, texture everywhere) to shoot some new accessory patterns that I’ve been working on this Winter. I’m happy to introduce Dryad — which has become an instant wardrobe luxury around BT headquarters, even despite the slow thaw that brings Spring.

Dryad

In the Fall I found myself frequently experiencing the urge for a serious cabled scarf — one that pulls out all the stops and doesn’t apologize for being dramatic. I wanted something wide and long, with big, plump cables that still retained a non-oppressive weight and elegant drape. As is usually the case, finding the right yarn for the job was the key to solidifying design, and made all of the above listed requirements possible.

Dryad

The scarf is knit with Blackstone Tweed, new from Berocco last Fall, a yarn that is special and unique and in my opinion stands out among the commercially available tweeds. Blackstone Tweed has a rustic look, but a surprising drape and hand, due in part to its interesting fiber composition (Wool, Superkid Mohair, Angora). Don’t be fooled though, this is not your average mohair/angora sneezy fuzzfest. The yarn is prepared with minimal halo and a lightly spun, crisp hand. The touch of angora (just 10%) adds amazing softness and really makes this a luxurious material. The drape that can be achieved, even in heavily cabled fabric is something definitely worth taking a second look at!

Dryad

All that said, it makes a perfect fit for a scarf that may otherwise be overly heavy or rigid. Even with 6-stitch cables, which begin to be voluptuously plump, the fabric still drapes and moves beautifully, and is quite visually appealing as well. A great color palette doesn’t hurt either.

Dryad

Back to my ever-present desire to be swathed in cables: this one definitely fits the bill. In general, I usually wait to absorb a new piece of knitting into regular wardrobe rotation until the pattern is written and the photo shoot complete… not only as a way to keep the work fresh for its close-up, but also to trick myself into getting the work done faster. This scarf has been burning a hole in my pile of finished knitting and I’ll be honest that I’ve been wrapped up in it ever since we wrapped the shoot. Even indoors. Which makes me think I may have a problem.

Dryad

The pattern has been provided for three differing lengths: 60, 75, and 90 inches. All sizes have a width of approximately 8.5 inches. The sample shown is the long version and can be wrapped and wrapped if you require a nest of cabled fabric around your face. If you’re less about the drama, a shorter version can be worked without problem.

Dryad

The pattern is now available in my Ravelry Store here as well as directly through Brooklyn Tweed. Pattern instructions for this piece are charted.

Dryad

Thanks also to my dear friend Sara for modeling — a Contemporary Italian Literature Scholar and truly fashionable Tuscan — she wears knitting quite well, wouldn’t you say? We shot these photos on location in a tower-filled, Medieval hilltown outside of Siena.

I hope you enjoy!