Have I had lace and cable combinations on the brain? Yes. Yes, I have.

When designing, I like thinking about macro versus micro: how the small details (which are often the original fodder for a concept) co-exist within a larger “environment”. In garment design this often involves thinking about how shape, silhouette and fit integrate with smaller details (be they technical or aesthetic) in order to achieve harmony across the whole. The process always feels like a negotiation to me: the further along a design gets, reigning in small details in service of the whole (or vice versa) is often a requisite process.

With Bray we have what I like to call a “three bears” situation: one large cable, one medium cable, and one small lace motif, combined in a single fabric and arranged in a way that applies to a broader “macro” application within a garment. The larger cables are placed along “suspender” lines and are the boldest vertical element, while the medium horseshoe and small lace insertions fill the remaining areas. I love how the heaviness of the cables is in contrast with the see-through eyelet columns, which contrast a feeling of lightness against the chiseled horseshoe cables.

The sleeves are worked in reverse stockinette to keep the focus on the body fabric (without overwhelming the wearer with texture overload). The yoke of the garment is a hybrid between a raglan and saddle shoulder: the first two-thirds of the sleeve cap is shaped as a true raglan until the width of the saddle is achieved. At that point the saddle is worked back and forth and shaped at the very top with a graduated bind off to give a more graceful curve to the finished neckline. The upper body pieces are also fashioned with two different sloping rates. This shaping keeps the shoulders from becoming too pointy or angular, as is sometimes the case with a saddle that does a 45° turn over the shoulder. (I’ve included the schematic below to show these different areas.)

On Wednesday I wrote about falling in love with a stitch pattern and not feeling “done” with it after finishing a single iteration of a design. This situation definitely applied to the Bray design as well. After wrapping up work on the pullover, my play with this fabric still felt incomplete, so I translated it into a hat design as well. Such fun!