Next up on the “designs published last year” list: a pair of colorwork house socks designed for Clara Parkes’ third book The Knitters Book of Socks. If you’re not familiar with Clara’s books, I strongly recommend all of them, particularly if you are interested in learning about wool properties or yarn construction.

As many of you know, I’m not much of a sock knitter – I’ve never been seized by the fever, though I do find them entertaining to knit every once in a while. This was my first go at actually designing a pair and I had a great time doing it.

 

 

You may recognize the motif & color combination as a companion design to the Strago Mittens (Fall 2010). Sometimes when I get an idea in my head, just one design isn’t enough and I like to continue exploring further applications. In this case I thought the graphic patterning of the mittens would suit a pair of warm, stranded socks perfectly (herringbone hound that I am).

 

 

I remember now – this was the first design commission I did when developing Shelter. The two colors – Fossil and Long Johns – were, at the time, the only two colors from the palette that I had on hand at my studio (these were the very first two colors the mill produced). I took this as a sign that a companion sock to the mittens should happen.

 

 

The socks are worked from cuff to toe and utilize a short-row heel. The ribbed cuff, heel and toe are worked in a solid color, while the rest of the sock is worked in a graphic, 2-color chevron pattern. I think these would look great in a more subtle, tonal colorway as well. (Greys anyone?)

 

 

Shelter is by no means a sock yarn – and it doesn’t claim to be – though I’ve knit a couple of pairs that I wear in the winter to keep my feet warm around the house, and it does the job wonderfully. I think of them more like slippers than socks. The double-thick fabric of colorwork makes these particular socks more durable than a plain stockinette pair, and that much warmer.

 

 

As for the rest of the book – it’s packed with great sock patterns! Some of them were enough to get me considering trying a pair or two…though I’m wary of going down the sock yarn rabbit hole to do so! Many knitters have never returned.

I hope you enjoy these, along with the rest of Clara’s informative, well-written homage to knitting for our feet.