Archives for category: Photography

My post last Wednesday sent me spiraling back into the archived photos from my Iceland trip – and my mind has been there ever since. I shared a few landscape and travel images last summer, but there were several more that never made it out for viewing. Today seems like a good day for some digital transportation to the north country, doesn’t it?

A red country road

Pastel ocean landscapes

An icelandic sheep with big personality

A cemetery full of trees

Blue coasts

Distant lighthouses under painterly clouds

Fiery lichens

A surreal herd of Icelandic Horses running through the hills

Surreal indeed

One of my favorite parts about developing yarns is seeing how they inspire other designers – what textures and color combinations other people are inspired by always gets me thinking about the yarns that I use every day in new and different ways. Last year, Stephen West approached me to say he was interested in doing a full design collection using Shelter and Loft – I was flattered, and very excited by the idea of seeing what he would cook up. As we further discussed the project,  we decided we’d also collaborate on a special photoshoot of the finished work the following summer.

Last July, after Stephen had finished designing and knitting his pieces, we met in Iceland for the shoot. It was my first time visiting this beautiful country, and I was completely intoxicated by the dramatic, natural beauty that the country is literally bursting at the seams with. Surrounded by such a visual feast of nature, I barely made it through the exit doors of the airport before my camera was out and firing away.

Stephen has been releasing his designs from this collection over the past few weeks on Ravelry, and I wanted to take a moment to share some of the images from the shoot that I particularly like. Summer light in Iceland (as was the case in Shetland, the year before) is almost too good to be true. Soft, ambient, sometimes dramatic, other times ethereal. Suitable shooting conditions also last about 20 hours a day! It was such a joy to explore and work in this place.

It was amazing to see how the colors of the yarns melded so well with the surrounding colors in the landscape – like the blue-green waves of the ocean on a black sand beach (pictured above). In my mind, mother nature is the very best inspiration for color!

We had fun styling and shooting several of the samples on both the male and female model.

The Hófsos Pullover (also showed at the top of the post on our male model, Diddi) combines large stripes and marl effects in some of my favorite colors of Loft.

Stephen has a great color sense – I loved some of his playful, unexpected combinations, like Nest, Sap, Button Jar and Woodsmoke (in the Kex Scarf, seen below in Shelter).

Looking over these images again has been really enjoyable and reminds me of what a great experience we had there. I often daydream about a return to the Icelandic countryside for future photography work. I’d love to go at a totally different time of year to do some night photography during the “dark season” as well…

All the patterns pictured above are available for purchase here on Ravelry. Each pattern’s page includes extended yardage and color information. Stephen also did a great write-up about our shoot, with several behind-the-scenes pictures that give readers a glimpse of what a shoot looks like on the other side of the camera!

Resuming this morning with more imagery from October in Harrsiville and the surrounding landscape.

You’ll notice a reflection theme running through these images. The nearby lakes and ponds were all so glassy and still – they look like mirrors in the early morning light. Beautiful.

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Just before the big crazy storm weather started, I spent the week in Harrisville at the spinning mill. The village is stunningly beautiful in all seasons, but nestling into the heart of New England in late October is particularly special. When in need of color inspiration, there aren’t too many things that can beat the myriad shades of fiery foliage that abound in this part of the country.

When in Harrisville, my shutter finger really starts twitching – so I thought I’d share some photographs from my trip with you this morning.

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On my trip to Iceland I had the pleasure of visiting Heimilisiðnaðarsafnið (try saying that three times fast) – the Icelandic Textile Museum in Blönduós.

In a country where knitting is such an integral part of cultural history, I knew I was in for a treat. Below are some images of work from the museum’s collection – I remember being struck by how smart a lot of the knitting here is. I particularly love the use of tone and color throughout; the lace work was especially exciting…

 

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A selection of images from my travels in Iceland – this country is truly beautiful!

Columnar basalt formations on the northern coast

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Fishing boats lit by all-night sunsets

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Abandoned coastal fishing structures

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Marshlands in the North

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A puffin colony off the coast of Reykjavik (click image to view larger)

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Icelandic Sheep – one of Iceland’s most valued resources

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Black sand beaches covered in golden grasses

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Lichen on an abandoned stone fishing hut in Hofsós

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Hólavallagarður Cemetary, Reykjavik

 More to come… my camera has gotten a serious workout here!

Some classic black & white eye candy from Spring Thaw for you on this Thursday morning…

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A parcel of beautiful yarns from Habu Textiles has brought some wonderful inspiration into our studio.

Yarns made from paper, stainless steel, silk, wool and copper – in a gorgeous tonal palette. Inspirational, indeed!

We’ve received tons of inquiries regarding the images of the abandoned railroad station in our Wool People 2 look book, so I thought I’d share some location information here for all of you texture lovers and history buffs.

These images feature the overgrown railways of Communipaw Station, which is nestled on the edge of the Hudson and overlooks Ellis Island, the Statue of Liberty and downtown Manhattan, from the Jersey side.

The historic station building is a gorgeous brick structure that was built in 1889. The tracks you see in these photos were in regular service until April of 1967, at which time their use was suspended.

The station is now part of Liberty State Park, which opened in the mid 70′s and encircles the riverside station with 1200 acres of park land. Today, the station functions as a Ferry Terminal for tourists to Ellis and Liberty Islands – the nearby tracks remain a mere vestige of the past. I think they are incredibly beautiful and a great hidden treasure of the city.

I’ve just returned from our Alaskan knitting cruise – my winter sweaters happily emerged from hibernation for the trip. As for the scenery and the light…