Archives for category: Photography

Every so often a photoshoot location comes along that just blows me away – either for its history, its beauty, or in the best-case scenario its combination of both. We were lucky enough to find a truly stunning one for our BT Men shoot, and I wanted to take the opportunity to share a little bit of history about this place with you here.

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The space shown in these photos  is situated on the top floor of one of what was originally 16 industrial buildings dotting the waterfront along the East River in the Greenpoint neighborhood of Brooklyn. Originally called the “Greenpoint Terminal Market”, this complex of 19th century buildings was once an industrial juggernaut, housing multiple maritime warehouse operations, including the American Manufacturing Company – then the largest manufacturer of maritime rope in the entire country.

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At its peak, the Market employeed over 2,500 workers and spanned 6 city blocks. Walking through some of the now-abandoned spaces really got my mind wandering. I love imagining the sights, sounds, and lives that occupied this space during that period.

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In 2006, the complex was engulfed in one of the worst fires in NYC’s recent history – the “five alarm” blaze required 350 firefighters and 70 individual units to extinguish. Much of the complex that stretches along sleepy West Street was destroyed in the fire and soon after demolished. Those few buildings that did survive, however, have been given new life through the help of artists and entrepeneuers who have repurposed many of the spaces as studios or business start-up locations.

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Shooting in this space was a true pleasure and gave my nerdy, NYC-historian side some serious research material to geek out over.

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If you’d like to read more about the history of the Greenpoint Terminal Market (or some of its more recent real estate scandals) – check out this wonderful article from Atlas Obscura.

 

Is it May already? This time of year always seems to fly right by – before you know it winter has slipped through the cracks and summer is right around the corner. The past few weeks have been positively delightful weather-wise; a late spring, but one that was definitely worth the wait!

Today I’m happy to announce our newest collaborative effort – the fifth (!) installment in our ongoing Wool People series is all polished up and ready for spring and summer knitting!

Back in August when I began mapping out the concepts and art direction for this collection, I thought it would be fun to do a sort of “shawl challenge” – since spring always seems to be the time when my own lace bug reawakens, hungry for a new project. Lace is perfect for outdoor knitting and travel, two things that many of us will do often in the coming months. I love how something as lightweight and portable as an in-progress shawl packs so much value in terms of both knitting time and mental satisfaction.

Standing on this end of the collection timeline, it’s rewarding to see finished design work from the 7 “lace whisperers” featured in this spread. A nice variety of both lace & textured stitch patterns, simple to more involved techniques, and essential shapes to knit and wear – all worked in soft and airy Loft.

Of course at the core, we are sweater people – no matter what the season – and this collection has more than just lace to offer. I received some beautiful garment and accessory design submissions in this group: great looks for layering during the evenings in chillier summer climates (you lucky people) or in anticipation of next fall. Both the Reverb cardigan and the Bolt scarf (shown below) just scream for autumn, and there’s plenty of knitting time to get them done!

The look book introduces the collection in its entirety with full page photography spreads showcasing the new designs along with blueprints that are intended to introduce the architectural/technical elements of each pattern. When considering a new knitting project, I always like knowing what I’m getting into with a schematic “road map” and some notes on construction, shape and assembly.

Between the aesthetic and technical components of the look book, I hope you’ll enjoy getting to know this new collection of work. Happy spring to each of you!

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Resources: The Wool People 5 look book can be viewed on our website here, or download the free PDF for viewing on your tablet or device. Each pattern is available for instant download here, or on Ravelry.com. Brooklyn Tweed yarns used in the collection are available for purchase online, or at one of our flagship retail locations.

My post last Wednesday sent me spiraling back into the archived photos from my Iceland trip – and my mind has been there ever since. I shared a few landscape and travel images last summer, but there were several more that never made it out for viewing. Today seems like a good day for some digital transportation to the north country, doesn’t it?

A red country road

Pastel ocean landscapes

An icelandic sheep with big personality

A cemetery full of trees

Blue coasts

Distant lighthouses under painterly clouds

Fiery lichens

A surreal herd of Icelandic Horses running through the hills

Surreal indeed

One of my favorite parts about developing yarns is seeing how they inspire other designers – what textures and color combinations other people are inspired by always gets me thinking about the yarns that I use every day in new and different ways. Last year, Stephen West approached me to say he was interested in doing a full design collection using Shelter and Loft – I was flattered, and very excited by the idea of seeing what he would cook up. As we further discussed the project,  we decided we’d also collaborate on a special photoshoot of the finished work the following summer.

Last July, after Stephen had finished designing and knitting his pieces, we met in Iceland for the shoot. It was my first time visiting this beautiful country, and I was completely intoxicated by the dramatic, natural beauty that the country is literally bursting at the seams with. Surrounded by such a visual feast of nature, I barely made it through the exit doors of the airport before my camera was out and firing away.

Stephen has been releasing his designs from this collection over the past few weeks on Ravelry, and I wanted to take a moment to share some of the images from the shoot that I particularly like. Summer light in Iceland (as was the case in Shetland, the year before) is almost too good to be true. Soft, ambient, sometimes dramatic, other times ethereal. Suitable shooting conditions also last about 20 hours a day! It was such a joy to explore and work in this place.

It was amazing to see how the colors of the yarns melded so well with the surrounding colors in the landscape – like the blue-green waves of the ocean on a black sand beach (pictured above). In my mind, mother nature is the very best inspiration for color!

We had fun styling and shooting several of the samples on both the male and female model.

The Hófsos Pullover (also showed at the top of the post on our male model, Diddi) combines large stripes and marl effects in some of my favorite colors of Loft.

Stephen has a great color sense – I loved some of his playful, unexpected combinations, like Nest, Sap, Button Jar and Woodsmoke (in the Kex Scarf, seen below in Shelter).

Looking over these images again has been really enjoyable and reminds me of what a great experience we had there. I often daydream about a return to the Icelandic countryside for future photography work. I’d love to go at a totally different time of year to do some night photography during the “dark season” as well…

All the patterns pictured above are available for purchase here on Ravelry. Each pattern’s page includes extended yardage and color information. Stephen also did a great write-up about our shoot, with several behind-the-scenes pictures that give readers a glimpse of what a shoot looks like on the other side of the camera!

Resuming this morning with more imagery from October in Harrsiville and the surrounding landscape.

You’ll notice a reflection theme running through these images. The nearby lakes and ponds were all so glassy and still – they look like mirrors in the early morning light. Beautiful.

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Just before the big crazy storm weather started, I spent the week in Harrisville at the spinning mill. The village is stunningly beautiful in all seasons, but nestling into the heart of New England in late October is particularly special. When in need of color inspiration, there aren’t too many things that can beat the myriad shades of fiery foliage that abound in this part of the country.

When in Harrisville, my shutter finger really starts twitching – so I thought I’d share some photographs from my trip with you this morning.

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On my trip to Iceland I had the pleasure of visiting Heimilisiðnaðarsafnið (try saying that three times fast) – the Icelandic Textile Museum in Blönduós.

In a country where knitting is such an integral part of cultural history, I knew I was in for a treat. Below are some images of work from the museum’s collection – I remember being struck by how smart a lot of the knitting here is. I particularly love the use of tone and color throughout; the lace work was especially exciting…

 

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A selection of images from my travels in Iceland – this country is truly beautiful!

Columnar basalt formations on the northern coast

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Fishing boats lit by all-night sunsets

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Abandoned coastal fishing structures

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Marshlands in the North

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A puffin colony off the coast of Reykjavik (click image to view larger)

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Icelandic Sheep – one of Iceland’s most valued resources

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Black sand beaches covered in golden grasses

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Lichen on an abandoned stone fishing hut in Hofsós

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Hólavallagarður Cemetary, Reykjavik

 More to come… my camera has gotten a serious workout here!

Some classic black & white eye candy from Spring Thaw for you on this Thursday morning…

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A parcel of beautiful yarns from Habu Textiles has brought some wonderful inspiration into our studio.

Yarns made from paper, stainless steel, silk, wool and copper – in a gorgeous tonal palette. Inspirational, indeed!